Macular Fibrosis

Macular fibrosis is a condition also referred to as a macular pucker, epiretinal membrane, or cellophane maculopathy. Macular fibrosis occurs when a thin sheet of scar tissue forms on top of the macula, in response to damage or injury. Damage to the macula may occur due to eye trauma, retinal tears or detachments, the shrinking of the vitreous, or systemic disease, such as diabetes or hypertension. Abnormal scar tissue that forms because of the effects of hypertension on the macula is called a hypertensive macular pucker.

When scar tissue forms on top of the macula, it can then contract and cause the macula to wrinkle, or pucker. The wrinkles in the macula cause straight-ahead vision to become blurred and distorted. If blurriness is mild and does not greatly affect daily activities such as reading and driving, treatment is not necessary. The condition is not likely to become worse. Rarely, a surgery called a vitrectomy will be performed to remove the vitreous fluid, and the scar tissue covering the macula will be peeled away to relieve the tension that’s causing the pucker.

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